Coventina Eagle at Chesters Roman Fort

150 years ago 19th century lead miners were prospecting for minerals in Northumberland and they discovered a square enclosure with a shaft in the middle.  It was a Roman shrine to an unknown goddess, later revealed to be Coventina.  The men found offerings at the site which included 14,000 bronze coins, most of which were entrusted to the British Museum, were they have been ever since.  But about 3000 of the coins could not be identified so John Collingwood-Bruce, an antiquarian of that time, had them melted down and re-cast into an eagle to adorn his elaborate neoclassical bookcase.

From April 2014, Coventina’s Eagle will be on display at Chesters Roman Fort, which is where the coins were taken immediately after excavation.

For more details here is an article from The Journal newspaper.

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